Pride Flag Book Tag

Yup, I’m ignoring my tag hoard to participate in another one I found via the social Internet — but how could I pass up this colorful tag created by Common Spence, which I found through May @ Forever and Everly

To truly fulfill the spirit of this tag, naturally I’m spotlighting only books that feature LGBTQIA+ protagonists.

Red (Life): A book with a spirited protagonist totally proud of who they are, someone who gives you life!

The City We Became by N.K. Jemisin works for this prompt on multiple levels: the main cast is comprised of QPoC who embody the five boroughs of NYC (plus one who represents the city as a whole), each of whom is absolutely proud to be who (and what/where) they are.

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Orange (Healing): A book that made you, as the reader, find a deeper meaning or catharsis in your own life.

I don’t know if I’ve ever felt more seen than when reading Picture Us in the Light by Kelly Loy Gilbert. Focusing on the Asian-American teen experience in the Silicon Valley/SF Bay Area, as experienced by a gay Chinese-American narrator caught up in the secrets of his family and his community, this book epitomizes the power of “quiet” Contemporary stories.

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Yellow (Sunshine): A book that fills you with so much joy it could brighten even your darkest day.

Okay yes fine, this answer was totally influenced by the title and cover. But I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson makes me smile just thinking about its characters and story … though it’s been quite a while, so I’m thinking it’s probably time for a reread.

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Green (Nature): A book that is set out of this world — a reality different from our own.

If there’s a more perfect answer to this prompt than Seanan McGuire’s Wayward Children series, I don’t know it. Everything about it is memorable, from the vivid and diverse characters to the range of worlds (yes, plural) that they call home.

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Blue (Peace): A book where one of the characters finds peace with a difficult truth.

My first response was Summer Bird Blue by Akemi Dawn Bowman, but to be quite honest, the book didn’t really resonate with me (and also it was May’s answer). So instead I’m picking An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green [sequel coming out next month!], which follows bisexual protagonist April May as she works through issues like fame and humanity.

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Purple (Spirit): A book that deals with LGBT+ themes and religion.

I had to think for a very long time about this one, because I honestly couldn’t recall any LGBTQ+ books I’d read which also center religion. So I’ve gone with the well-known and generally well-received Autoboyography by Christina Lauren — featuring a bisexual boy and a gay Mormon boy falling in love, though I should note that I’ve actually taken it off my TBR after reading CW’s review explaining several of its problematic aspects.

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Black/Brown (Inclusivity): A book where one of the characters is a queer character of color/queer indigenous character. [Prompt added by May.]

It’s Not Like It’s a Secret by Misa Sugiura features two QPoC, with the main romance between a Japanese-American girl and a Mexican-American girl, plus diverse secondary/minor characters. The coming-of-age narrative addresses intersectional issues, including queerphobia and racism, as well as celebrating East Asian and Latinx cultures. With moments ranging from emotional epiphanies to sweet slice-of-life, It’s Not Like It’s a Secret is an absolutely solid read.

I tag:
anyone who wants to participate!

3 thoughts on “Pride Flag Book Tag

  1. OMG! I’ve been so excited to read The City We Became, but I didn’t know it had queer characters! I was going to save it for July, but it may have just solidified its place in my Pride TBR I’m working through.

    Liked by 1 person

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